3-5 Feb 2017 - Outer Banks, NC

What a fabulous experience we had February 3-5, 2017, for the annual VSO Outer Banks field trip!  With the combined eyes and ears of 100 participants, we tallied a record-setting 155 species. Among these were several rarities: Manx Shearwater, Dovekie, Trumpeter Swan, Anna’s Hummingbird, Eurasian Wigeon, Anhinga, Lark Sparrow, Brewer’s Blackbird and Loggerhead Shrike. We also had an amazing number of Sparrow (11) and Wren (5) species.

Photos by Lee Adams

Photos by Bob Coles

Photos by Mary Lou Barritt

In addition to the rarities, highlights at Lake Mattamuskeet included up-close looks of an American Woodcock and Wilson’s Snipe. The impoundments always astonish us with an abundance of waterfowl, and this year was no different. Those who joined Lee Adams at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge at dusk to listen for Short-eared Owls scored a big success.

On Saturday many participants braved the strong winds and cold temperatures to visit nearby Jennette’s Pier twice – first thing in the morning and after lunch. We were rewarded with dozens of fly-by Razorbills, Red-breasted Mergansers, Northern Gannets and Black Scoters. In the water we spotted Horned Grebe and Red-throated Loon as well as a lone female Common Eider. At Pea Island we found several American White Pelicans and more than 100 American Avocets. We gathered at Bodie Island Lighthouse in the late afternoon, where we enjoyed diverse species of waterfowl in the impoundments. Many had good looks at a Sora, Clapper Rail, and Marsh Wren. More than 30 people stayed after dark to listen for owls, and they got Northern Saw-whet Owl and Great Horned Owl.

On Sunday morning’s trip to Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, we were delighted to find quite an array of raptors: Northern Harrier, Bald Eagle, Cooper’s Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, Red-shouldered Hawk, American Kestrel and Merlin. We added Lesser Yellowlegs and an early Yellow-throated Warbler to our species total for the weekend.

We dedicated the weekend to our beloved VSO member Jerry Thornhill, who died last year. Jerry was such a positive force about the Outer Banks trip – and ALL VSO field trips for that matter. His enthusiasm motivated many of his birding friends in Southwest VA to attend each year. We were gratified that his wife Jane continued the tradition by bringing 8 birders with her this year.

Special thanks to James Madison University professor Charles (Zig) Ziegenfus for bringing 6 students. Not only that, 4 of his graduates who attended last year came back this year and joined VSO because they had such a great experience. Zig has been bringing students to this trip for more than 40 years! We especially appreciate our team of exceptions trip leaders - Lee Adams, Bill Akers, and Jerry Via - who did an outstanding job of making sure participants in their groups saw as many species as possible.

Make plans to join us next year. We’ve already locked in the dates, February 2-4, 2018. We always have a memorable time, no matter what the weather brings!

Meredith Bell
VSO Field Trip Co-chair

Official List of Observed Species

 Snow Goose
Canada Goose
Tundra Swan
Trumpeter Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Eurasian Wigeon
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Common Eider
Harlequin Duck
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Manx Shearwater
Northern Gannet
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Anhinga
American White Pelican
Brown Pelican
American Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Black-crowned Night-Heron
White Ibis
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper’s Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Clapper Rail
Sora
American Coot
American Avocet
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet (Western)
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
American Woodcock
Dovekie
Razorbill
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Forster’s Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl
Short-eared Owl
Northern Saw-whet Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Anna’s Hummingbird ( feeder in Buxton)
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Merlin
Eastern Phoebe
Loggerhead Shrike
Blue-headed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
House Wren
Winter Wren
Sedge Wren
Marsh Wren
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
American Pipit
Cedar Waxwing
Black-and-white Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Eastern Towhee
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
Brewer’s Blackbird
Common Grackle
Boat-tailed Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

2-4 Dec 2016 - Virginia Beach, VA

Craney Island in Portsmouth, VA was the site of the kickoff field trip of the annual Virginia Society of Ornithology Virginia Beach weekend. Highlights include a black coyote, Hudsonian Godwit, Snow Buntings, and American Avocets FLOATING in the river. Oh yeah, and the Eurasian Wigeon! Thousands of Double-crested Cormorants streamed by in a long line. Brian Taber and Bill Williams from Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory lent their years of expertise at the site, and led the trip. They survey Craney Island regularly and continue Ruth Beck’s conservation efforts. For more information, check out http://www.cvwo.org. A flock of Snow Buntings appeared beside the car caravan and settled on the ground with Killdeer. Their camouflage is perfect for tan sand and golden grasses, and although the snow was missing, their white did not make it easier to spot them. Thanks go to Shannon Reinheimer of the Army Corps of Engineers for allowing access to, and important information on Craney Island. Later nine of us met Max Lonzanida, park ranger at the Fisherman Island/Eastern Shore of Virginia NWR at Fisherman Island. Due to restrictions on parking the trip was offered to those signed up for the Craney Island trip. The group wandered across the island and out to the beach on the Chesapeake Bay. Brant, Black Scoters and Hooded and Red-breasted Mergansers were spotted. A huge whale vertebra, a portion of an Atlantic Sturgeon, and sea turtle ribs were among the artifacts that have been collected by USFW staff to show visitors on the island. https://www.fws.gov/refuge/fisherman_island/  All photos below Copyright Lee Adams:

The Meet and Greet/Tally held at the hospitality room of the hotel had more than 25 people attending, sharing nibbles and beverages, and discussing great birding areas and recent trips.

Forty eight people braved the cold winds to visit the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel islands with the Virginia Society of Ornithology on December 3, 2016. Long-tailed Duck, Northern Gannet, Lesser Scaup, Purple Sandpiper and Great Cormorant were among the species of the morning. Harbor Seals were an added treat. Even with the brisk wind and the cold front that had moved through, there seemed to be fewer birds than expected. Some participants chose to head north to Chincoteague after the CBBT trip. At Willis Wharf many Marbled Godwits and Willets fed on the flats with a couple of Dunlin and a Forster’s Tern. American Oystercatchers and Greater Yellowlegs were foraging on the oyster beds at Queen Sound Landing on the causeway into Chincoteague. https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/vbwt/sites/queen-sound-public-landing/

The wildlife loop at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge held several immature Little Blue Herons and Tricolored Herons. Sharp eyes picked out two Eurasian Wigeons among the small American Wigeon flock. Green-winged Teal, Northern Shovelers, Northern Pintail, American Black Ducks, Mallards, Gadwall and Tundra Swans were watched by three Bald Eagles. Two eagles sat together in a bare tree. The winter daylight faded too quickly on a beautiful day. https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/vbwt/sites/chincoteague-national-wildlife-refuge/

Sunday's Virginia Society of Ornithology Back Bay NWR/False Cape State Park tram trip departed from normal by being neither rainy, nor horribly cold. Some participants even saw the continuing Lark Sparrow before boarding the tram. Gray skies did not dampen the enthusiasm and birders were rewarded with views of Northern Gannets and Brown Pelicans out over the ocean, raptors aplenty, and various waterfowl. A small flock of Snow Geese flew overhead and a flock of eight Hooded Mergansers dashed out of the water. When the tram reached False Cape State Park some folks opted to walk the road to the visitor center, while some stayed on the tram. Swamp Sparrows, a Marsh Wren, Palm Warbler and Common Yellowthroat obliged some with quick glimpses. Several King Rails, seeming not the least concerned about many people talking and crowding the edge of the road, wove in and out of the grasses along the water's edge, and even swam across the ditch toward us. A few people saw and photographed a Yellow-breasted Chat in a viney tangle near the visitor center. Erica Ryder, our tram driver extraordinaire and Visitor Services Specialist at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, pointed out an immature Little Blue Heron with an injured wing, which is continuing in an area near the bay. Motoring along the loop back into the wildlife refuge an impoundment held one American Coot and one White Ibis. A Wood Duck box had a gray Eastern Screech-owl perched at the entrance hole. Canada Geese, Tundra Swans, Ruddy, American Black & Ring-necked ducks, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Northern Pintail, Green-winged Teal and Lesser Scaup dotted the water. Bald Eagles stirred the ducks. Northern Harriers, Red-tailed Hawks, Cooper's Hawks and an American Kestrel all commandeered their own airspace. A cottonmouth, torpid from the cold, was hidden by a few strands of golden dried grass. It was lively enough to open wide and show its cottony-white mouth when people got too near trying to examine it. Sunday was a good day to be a birder in southeastern Virginia. A lucky few chose to search for a Le Conte's Sparrow in the Beasley Tract of the Princess Anne WMA 20 miles away from Back Bay, and refound the bird. What a spectacular way to end a wonderful weekend.https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/vbwt/sites/back-bay-national-wildlife-refuge/

https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/vbwt/sites/false-cape-state-park/

16-18 Sep 2016 - Chincoteague NWR, Accomack County

We could not have asked for better weather for the VSO field trip to Chincoteague on September 16-18, with sunny to partly cloudy skies for the entire weekend. We were excited to welcome many new members and first-time attendees, along with “old timers” who’ve been enthusiastic participants for decades. Our group of 85 tallied 129 species (see below), and the list included birds found on the Causeway, Chincoteague Island and Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge. Unfortunately, mosquitoes were abundant everywhere on the Refuge, so it’s hard to tell how many pints of blood were unwillingly left behind!  Please note that this report continues after the gallery of images shown below (all photos taken by Lee Adams) so make sure to check it out!

Many thanks to field trip leaders Jerry Via, Bill Akers, Bob Ake, Mike Schultz, Saundra Winstead, Morocco St. Andre, and Meredith and Lee Bell, who worked hard to ensure participants had a great experience. Jerry kicked off the weekend Friday evening with a fascinating presentation on bird migration.

In addition to the “regulars,” we were thrilled to see species that we don’t get every year, including:

- American Golden Plover on the Wildlife Loop and one of the bus trips
- Piping Plover and Red Knot at Swans Cove
- Philadelphia Vireo and a family of Red-headed Woodpeckers on the Woodland
Trail
- Canada, Wilson’s and Magnolia Warblers on the Woodland Trail
- Buff-breasted, Stilt, White-rumped and Pectoral Sandpipers
- Red-breasted Nuthatches in good numbers on the Woodland Trail and
Wildlife Loop
- Whimbrel and Wild Turkey on the bus trip

While sparrow and thrush species were sparse, we had an abundance of Brown-headed Nuthatches on the Refuge as well as on the property of the Refuge Inn. Many guests also enjoyed the calls of a Great-Horned Owl after dark.

The boat trip Saturday afternoon in Tom’s Cove was a big hit, with 65 people enjoying close-up views of many species during low tide. Bob Ake did an outstanding job leading the group, with assistance from Mike Schultz.

As we did in 2015 for Ruth Beck and Peggy Opengari, we gathered at sunrise on Sunday morning to celebrate the lives of four very special VSO members we lost this past year: Fenton Day, Barbara Hudgins, Gene Moore and Jerry Thornhill. Jerry Via made some very touching comments about each person, and then others spoke up to describe their own stories and experiences. It was a lovely way to remember these remarkable people, and we all agreed it would become a tradition of the Chincoteague trip

We’ve already locked in the 2017 dates, September 15-17. Mark your calendar now and plan to join us for spectacular birding at a remarkable place!

Meredith Bell
VSO Field Trip Co-chair

Official List of Observed Species

Canada Goose
Gadwall
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Wild Turkey
Double-crested Cormorant
Brown Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
White Ibis
Glossy Ibis
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Clapper Rail
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Whimbrel
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Stilt Sandpiper
Sanderling
Dunlin
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern
Sandwich Tern
Black Skimmer
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Great Horned Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo
Philadelphia Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
House Wren
Carolina Wren
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Black-and-white Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Canada Warbler
Wilson’s Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Savannah Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
Boat-tailed Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Baltimore Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

19 Aug 2016 - Craney Island, Portsmouth, VA

27 members of the Virginia Society of Ornithology met at Craney Island Disposal Area in Portsmouth on August 19, 2016 to observe shorebird migration and the breeding birds that use the habitat created there. Guided by members of CVWO, Bill Williams, Brian Taber and Dave Youker, and accompanied by Kristen Scheler and several others from the Army Corps of Engineers which manages the site, the trip lasted four hours. Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory supports the on-going survey which continues Ruth Beck's long-standing conservation and education efforts at Craney Island and several other coastal Virginia sites. http://www.cvwo.org/

At the first stop on the high perimeter road, overlooking an impoundment along the south side, Black-necked Stilts, some in family groups, American Avocets, Stilt Sandpipers and both Yellowlegs were seen. Wilson's Phalaropes swam circles. Two Green Herons flew by while Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, & Snowy Egrets stalked the shallows. A Clapper Rail hugged the shoreline. An immature Bald Eagle sat barely concealed in the top of a tall pine. A Red-shouldered Hawk streaked directly over. En route to the next stop four Red-tailed Hawks were spotted perched on the power line poles. Brown Pelicans, Great Black-backed, Herring and Laughing Gulls, with several Lesser Black-backed and Ring-billed Gulls, sat on a sandbar on the east side. Caspian, Royal, and Common Terns were mixed in with Least Terns. The tide was too high to reveal flats for shorebirds but one Willet walked the shore. At a northwest impoundment shorebirds were feeding. Semipalmated Sandpipers predominated with some Least and Western among them.

A Black Swan that has been seen at Craney for a month was preening along the shore of an impoundment in the company of a Mallard. Ruddy Ducks, Northern Shovelers, a Green-winged Teal and many Mallards swam in the distance. Black Terns flew over. Two Yellow Warblers moved in the tops of the reeds. Chimney Swifts, Purple Martins, Barn and Bank Swallows cruised over. A Sharp-shinned Hawk and several Cooper's Hawks were seen. As the end of the trip drew close seven Glossy Ibis were spotted flying high over the I-664 bridge/tunnel.

Many thanks go to the Army Corps of Engineers for allowing the field trip, and to Bill Williams, Brian Taber and Dave Youker for their expert birding skills and extreme patience.

Lee Adams
VSO Field Trip Co-chair

Official List of Observed Species

American Black Duck
Black Swan
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Ruddy Duck
Double-crested Cormorant
Brown Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Green Heron
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper’s Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Clapper Rail
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
Stilt Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Wilson’s Phalarope
Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Forster’s Tern
Royal Tern
Rock Pigeon
Chimney Swift
Mourning Dove
Eastern Kingbird
American Crow
Fish Crow
Horned Lark
Purple Martin
Bank Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Wren
Eastern Bluebird
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Yellow Warbler
Pine Warbler
Seaside Sparrow
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Boat-tailed Grackle
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

10-12 Jun 2016 - Highland County, VA

The weather was spectacular for the summer VSO field trip June 10-12, in Highland County. 49 enthusiastic birders tallied 102 species over the 3 days. Great finds included 16 warbler, 8 flycatcher and 7 woodpecker species. Many thanks to my fabulous field trip co-chair, Lee Adams, who assisted in leading groups on Saturday and Sunday; and to Wayne O'Bryan for allowing us to visit their property Sunday morning.

Friday afternoon was spent at nearby Forks of Water and Rainbow Springs Retreat property (a lovely restored 1870s farmhouse where 4 of us stayed). We were rewarded with a nice variety including Baltimore Orioles, Warbling Vireo, Yellow Warbler and Cedar Waxwings at the first stop, followed by more Baltimore Orioles, Yellow Warbler, Broad-winged Hawk and singing Wood Thrush at the second.

Friday evening we gathered at The Real Deal restaurant for dinner, where the owners set up a buffet to accommodate our large group, serving delicious smoked beef and pork BBQ.

Saturday we divided into two groups and explored the northwest section of the county. We covered the same areas but from opposite directions, including Rt. 601 (Bear Mountain Rd), Rt. 54 (Lake Buffalo Rd), Laurel Fork, Straight Fork and various stops in-between. Along the way, we found many sought-after warblers: Canada, Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian, Blackthroated Green, American Redstart and Magnolia. We even found a Mourning Warbler along Lake Buffalo Rd, nesting in the exact same spot where we found it three years ago. On Rt. 601 we got Vesper Sparrow. The other group got Alder Flycatcher, in different spots.

Sunday morning we birded Wimer Mountain Road and the beautiful O'Bryan property. We found Golden-winged Warblers behind the house and off the road. While that was certainly the target bird, we also enjoyed Bobolink, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Cedar Waxwing and Indigo Bunting. 

Spectacular views of the mountains, hills and valleys of Highland County added to the enjoyment. Many first-time visitors said the scenery alone was worth the trip. Our fantastic group of birders made this a truly memorable weekend! Complete list of species for the 3 days follows.

Meredith Bell
VSO Field Trip Co-chair

Official List of Observed Species

Canada Goose
Mallard
Great Blue Heron
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Killdeer
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Whip-poor-will
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Willow Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Yellow-throated Vireo
Blue-headed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
House Wren
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Veery
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Golden-winged Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Mourning Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow